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ICYMI: June 22 - June 28
1 min read

ICYMI: June 22 - June 28

ICYMI: June 22 - June 28

ICYMI is posted every Monday recapping privacy news over the last week from around the web.


How to make sure Google automatically deletes your data on a regular basis

The company announced on Wednesday that auto-delete will be the default setting for user account activity settings. That said, this “default” setting only applies to new accounts or existing accounts that now turn on data retention after having it disabled. And the default auto-delete time still gives Google as much as three years of your data, as opposed to manual auto-delete settings that keep as little as three months’ worth.

This doesn't change anything.  Google is still the upstanding citizen they've always been.


Apple Just Crippled IDFA, Sending An $80 Billion Industry Into Upheaval

Yesterday Apple killed the IDFA [Identifier for Advertisers] without killing the IDFA, by taking it out of the depths of the Settings app where almost no-one could find it — although increasingly people were finding it and turning it off — and making it explicitly opt-in for every single app. If an app wants to use the IDFA, iOS 14 will present mobile users with a big scary dialog like this:

Great new privacy feature for iPhone users with the next major software update. Who in their right mind would intentionally allow this?


New features coming with iOS 14.

iOS users have a good looking update coming.  The new approximate location and recording indicator features look fantastic.