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ICYMI: July 13 - July 19
2 min read

ICYMI: July 13 - July 19

ICYMI: July 13 - July 19

ICYMI is posted every Monday recapping privacy news over the last week from around the web.


Ubuntu Will No Longer Track Which Packages Users Install

The “popularity-contest” tool that has shipped as part of the standard Ubuntu install since the distro’s early days is being decoupled from the install image.

But what does popcon do? Well, to quote the Ubuntu help page for it:
The Ubuntu Popularity Contest […] gathers statistics determining which packages are the most popular with Ubuntu users. Once a week, the popularity-contest package submits data to a central server.

The less data collected, the better.


Pop Smoke's social media led killers to LA home after he posted his address online by mistake

Back in February, the Los Angeles Times reported that the rapper had posted photos on social media showing large amounts of money, designer goods, and a luxury car. He also posted a story on Instagram and Facebook of designer bags, and the house’s full address could be read on the packaging.
[...] “We believe that it was a robbery. Initially, we didn’t really have the evidence but then we discovered some other evidence that showed this was likely a home invasion gone bad,” Tippet told The Associated Press.

This can, and does, happen to anyone and it's a common occourance thanks to social media. People post they are on vacation and someone will break in because they know they're gone.  Others post pictures of their full credit card information for some reason.  Checking in your location everywhere you go took off with Foursquare and Path a decade ago and has since proliferated across the web and found a home in every single social media platform out there.

Always be mindful about what you're posting online and remember to stop and think if it truly needs to be on the internet forever.


Mozilla Puts Its Trusted Stamp on VPN

With no long-term contracts required, the Mozilla VPN is available for just $4.99 USD per month and will initially be available in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Singapore, Malaysia, and New Zealand, with plans to expand to other countries this Fall.

A great service from a trusted company.  For those who would rather go straight to the source, Mullvad is the VPN behind the curtain here (which is one of the best VPNs on the market).